Hope

Project Prep

Have you ever had good intentions for a project, only to find out you didn’t calculate everything very well? Maybe you weren’t able to finish it on time or it came out over budget.

We can learn a lot from how Nehemiah approached his project, Operation Rebuild Jerusalem. He succeeded in his venture by doing four things: conversing with the king, coordinating the details, canvassing the job site, and contending with difficulty.

First, he conversed with the king (see Nehemiah 2:1-5). Four months had passed between chapter 1 and 2, meaning Nehemiah had plenty of time not just to pray and prepare for this conversation with Artaxerxes, but also for the job ahead. And he let the king know that: he humbly, tactfully, and respectfully asked for permission to leave his job as cupbearer and help rebuild Jerusalem. His burden that began with weeping in chapter 1 had developed into a full-on calling. He knew he was the guy for the job.

So Nehemiah began to coordinate the much-needed details with the king (see Nehemiah 2:6-9). He set a time frame, got permits for traveling and building, and put together supplies. I think there are three reasons why Nehemiah received these requests: Number one, godly prayer (see v. 4). Number two, God’s partner. It’s thought that the queen mentioned in verse 6 was the only daughter of Queen Esther and believed in the Hebrew God. Do you think she had any influence in making sure all of Nehemiah’s needs were met? You bet. And number three was God’s providence. Anything can be done when the good hand of God is upon you (see v. 8).

Next, Nehemiah went and canvassed the job site: Jerusalem (see Nehemiah 2:11-16). If the news of Jerusalem had brought tears to his eyes, imagine what it was like seeing it in person. But great works begin when we walk through the nighttime of sorrow and our hearts are broken by Gethsemane’s darkness. When Nehemiah returned, he rallied the people together to begin building, and they said, “‘Let us rise up and build.’ Then they set their hands to this good work” (v. 18).

And right off the bat, Nehemiah had to contend with difficulty, which came in the form of three men: Sanballat, Tobiah, and Geshem. These men used the weapons of ridicule and doubt to try to stop Nehemiah’s efforts (see Nehemiah 2:19)—but just read his response: “The God of heaven Himself will prosper us; therefore we His servants will arise and build, but you have no heritage or right or memorial in Jerusalem” (v. 20).

He didn’t attempt to negotiate; after all, if you play tug-of-war with your enemy long enough, someone’s going to get pulled down into the mud. So he simply let go of the rope. And guess what? God took hold of it. But more on that next time.

Take some time to examine your heart: What projects do you need to turn over to the Lord today? How are you trusting Him with your plans and desires?

Advertisements
Hope

What If?

That tiny, two‑letter word if can either make us or break us. It offers spectacular possibility or eternal regret: What if I were to grasp all that life had to offer me? or If only I had taken that opportunity!

Nehemiah wasn’t an “if only” regretter, but a “what iffer,” someone who said, “What if God were to use me?” Let’s look at four questions he asked in Nehemiah 1 and see how they apply to us today.

  1. What if you don’t like the answers? When Nehemiah asked, “How are my people faring in Jerusalem?” the answer broke his heart: the city walls were broken down, its gates were burned with fire, and its people were bruised and broken, vulnerable to enemies (see Nehemiah 1:1-3).

How are the walls around your heart and home? Are the gates keeping the enemies out—those certain things on television and the Internet? To find out, we, like Nehemiah, need to ask the right questions—even if it’s hard, and even if we don’t like the answers. So be a Nehemiah to your family and friends. Don’t wonder one day, What if I would have asked them, “Are you really doing okay?”

  1. What if life gives you lemons? When Nehemiah heard the bad news, he “sat down and wept, and mourned for many days; I was fasting and praying before the God of heaven” (v. 4). First off, bravo to him for not being afraid to weep over the things that make God weep. Life handed him a lot of lemons, and he responded by mourning, fasting, and praying. So if life gives you lemons, go ahead and cry, but then try to make lemonade—see what God will do with your tears and prayers.
  2. What if at first you don’t succeed? This is where we find the nation of Israel: they had broken the Mosaic covenant (see v. 7), and Babylon had taken them off into exile. So Nehemiah prayed a specific prayer, looking up, in, and around.

First, he looked up. He remembered who God is and what He had done (see v. 5). God had kept His promises to Israel before, and He would keep them again.

Second, Nehemiah looked in (see vv. 6-9), saying, “I know why we’re in exile: we worshiped false idols. But if we turn around and repent, the blessings are ours once again.” When we get real and repent of the sins we’ve committed—sins that contribute to the decline of our nation, by the way—and say, “O God, we’ll return to You,” do you think revival could happen in our country once again? I believe it with all of my heart. But it starts by looking inward.

Finally, Nehemiah looked around (see v. 10). This was the hopeful part of his prayer: he realized he was part of a nation that could play a big role in God’s plan. Ladies, each one of us are bricks in the wall of God’s holy temple. We need to look around and find other women who are ready to lock shields with us and get their hands dirty in the Lord’s work.

  1. What if the shoe fits? Nehemiah ended his prayer by simply saying, “Let Your servant prosper this day, I pray, and grant him mercy in the sight of this man” (v. 11)—his boss, the heathen king of Persia. He resolved his “what if” pretty easily, didn’t he? What if God could use me in this situation? Well, I’ll just ask the king and find out.

So what about you? Are you content to be filled with the regrets, with “if only”s? Or are you ready to see God bring spectacular results by stepping out in a few “what if”s?

Hope

Hope Changes Everything

Do you need a little hope refresher today?

Hope is not wishing on a star: “Star light, star bright, the first star I see tonight….” Hope is not blowing out the candles on your birthday cake. Hope is not crossing your fingers before buying a lottery ticket.

Real, biblical hope is a strong, confident expectation for a future reward. And hope and faith are inextricably intertwined. As Hebrews 11:1 tells us, “Now faith is the substance of things hoped for, the evidence of things not seen.” And Romans 8:24-25 says, “Hope that is seen is not hope; for why does one still hope for what he sees? But if we hope for what we do not see, we eagerly wait for it with perseverance.”

Did you know this is the kind of hope Nehemiah had? The Jewish people had been in Babylonian exile for seventy years, and one day Nehemiah said, “I want to go back to Jerusalem and help rebuild.” So he did—he left his job as cupbearer to the king and went to rebuild the walls of the city that had been decimated decades earlier by Nebuchadnezzar.

When he got there, the damage was worse than what he’d been told. There was so much ruin that an average guy might have thought rebuilding wasn’t such a good idea after all. But Nehemiah wasn’t your average Joe.

Do you know how long it took him and the people to build the walls? Fifty-two days. When you look at that in the light of history, it’s amazing.

That’s not to say he didn’t run into obstacles. Nehemiah faced setbacks, fought spiritual battles, and had to deal with Israel’s enemies and their threats. Yet he had a hope that anchored his soul (see Hebrews 6:19). He was like Tigger in Winnie the Pooh: he was bouncy, bouncy, bouncy. No obstacle in the way of a Tigger, right?

I don’t know what you’re facing in this season in your life, but I know God can take whatever it is and do something amazing. You know why? Because hope changes everything.

So I invite you to join me on this blog over the coming months as we take a fresh look at the life of Nehemiah, discovering not just how he was able to live so full of hope—but how you can, too.